Federal Regulators Warn Consumers about the Dangers of Peloton Exercise Machine

A video showing a small child dragged underneath an operating Peloton exercise machine have gone viral and sparked complaints about the expensive exercise equipment.

The video shared by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission on Saturday showed a young boy playing near a Peloton Tread+ when the ball he’s using gets trapped under the equipment and he gets pulled beneath.

Federal regulators say they've received 39 complaints about such mishaps with the machine and the Commission has urged consumers to stop using the machine because of the dangers it poses to children and pets.

“In light of multiple reports of children becoming entrapped, pinned, and pulled under the rear roller of the product, CPSC urges consumers with children at home to stop using the product immediately.”

Peloton customers who want to continue to machines should keep them in a locked room away from kids and pets — as well as unplug them when not in use and keep all other objects away from them, the agency said.

Television ads for the Peloton exercise device have been ubiquitous during the COVID-19 pandemic as people have remained in their homes without the opportunity of going to the local gym for exercise.

A California woman is suing exercise equipment maker Peloton for marketing its products as safe despite a federal agency’s “urgent” safety warning over its Tread+ line of treadmills following a spate of injuries to children.

“The Tread+ contains significant design flaws that makes it defective, unfit for use in a home with children, and unreasonably dangerous for its intended purpose. Namely, because the design is extremely susceptible to children (and pets) getting trapped underneath the machine while it is operating,” says the class action lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday.

“CPSC staff believes the Peloton Tread+ poses serious risks to children for abrasions, fractures, and death,” the warning states. “In light of multiple reports of children becoming entrapped, pinned, and pulled under the rear roller of the product, CPSC urges consumers with children at home to stop using the product immediately.”

The commission also said it believes that at least one incident occurred while a parent was running on the treadmill, and shared a video of an unsupervised child being sucked under the machine. The child was eventually able to dislodge himself and walk way.

Albright’s complaint says Peloton has defied the CPSC warning and continues to claim that its device is safe, “despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.”

The luxury brand sells its treadmills for $4,295.00, and charges $39 for a monthly subscription to its on-demand fitness classes.

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